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There are plenty of passionate Cliff Richard fans in this town, with the musical legend’s Burswood Dome concert alongside The Shadows sold out.

Fans have been starved of the chance to see the band live since 1961, resulting in unprecedented demand.

A second concert was announced. The band will be playing again on Sunday February 7.

Legendary guitarist Hank Marvin, who plays in The Shadows, lives a mostly quiet existence in East Perth, but will surely bust out some hot tunes during the tour.

It is 50 years since Cliff Richard and The Shadows got together. This Australian tour, billed as their Final Reunion, will bring them back to Oz for the first time since 1961.

Promoter Paul Dainty said there had been “unprecedented demand for tickets for this tour.  Cliff Richard and the Shadows have not been to Australia since 1961 so it’s been a long wait to see this legendary band”.

Tickets for the Sunday February 7 show go on sale on September 17, from midday.

Bookings can be made through www.ticketek.com.au or 132 849.

Source  :  www.watoday.com.au

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AUSTRALIA has delivered a blunt message to India that it is selling education, not visas, even as the Rudd government deploys its most senior ministers to patch up relations damaged over a series of Indian student assaults.

Trade Minister Simon Crean, whose visit to India this week overlaps that of Deputy Prime Minister Julia Gillard, outlined to the Confederation of Indian Industry yesterday federal government measures to crack down on shonky education and training providers in Australia.

But he said the crackdown could be successful only if similar action were taken in India to close down shonky education and immigration agents running scams to secure permanent Australian residency through student visas.

“Let’s be clear, we are offering a quality education in a safe environment,” Mr Crean said yesterday. “The quality of our education is what we are promoting, not the visa attached to it.

“For this to succeed, we also need the co-operation of the Indian government. The fact that politicians in both countries have been forced to focus on the issue improves the odds of coming up with a better system.”

Ms Gillard is understood to have delivered a similar message during meetings with Indian Human Resources Development Minister Kapil Sibal and, late on Tuesday night, with Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, where greater engagement between the two countries on defence, energy and climate change were also discussed.

Mr Crean denied Australia’s international education industry needed to be remarketed in India, despite the fact it is widely seen — and in some areas promoted — as a pathway to permanent residency.

But he conceded better co-operation between Australian government agencies was also needed to help stem student visa abuses.

What the student issue has done is shed a light on the importance of interaction between Austrade, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and those that market our services in the Department of Education, Employment and Work Relations in the protection of our brand,” he said yesterday.

In just eight days, India will have hosted three of Australia’s most senior politicians, Mr Crean, Ms Gillard and Wayne Swan.

By the end of the year, a total of eight Australian ministers will have graced Indian soil.

The ministerial offensive is aimed at patching bilateral relations, damaged by a recent series of attacks on Indian students in Australia, as well as building trade relations with the emerging Asian superpower.

Mr Crean, who is in India for a two-day meeting of G20 trade ministers ahead of the next Doha round of WTO talks in Pittsburgh later this month, said Australia’s trade relationship with India had historically been “underdone”.

The ministerial visits — which will culminate in a tour by Kevin Rudd later this year — were designed to correct that.

“We understand the fundamental importance of India to our future, just as we do China and the rest of Asia. This is going to be the fastest-growing region in the world for the next couple of decades, it is the place to be,” he said. “Australia fortunately positioned itself for that a couple of decades ago but we have to renew the effort.

“Obviously, if there is a hiccup in the relationship, as there has been here over student safety, of course we have to address it. Visits here are an important part of that.”

Canberra hopes that a successful culmination of the Doha talks — aimed at reducing international trade barriers — will help accelerate free trade agreement negotiations between Australia and India, still at the feasibility stage.

It was also concentrating on building trade ties in infrastructure and energy security areas, with particular focus on investments in gas and coal.

Mr Crean denied that Australia’s refusal to sell uranium to India — a non-signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty — would hurt the progress of the talks, despite Mr Singh again raising the issue during his meeting with Ms Gillard.

Source  :  The Australian

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WHILE the plunge in western suburbs property prices is common knowledge, at least one prominent millionaire is willing to test the waters.

 

Eileen Bond, ex-wife of businessman Alan Bond, wants to sell one of her plush Peppermint Grove homes.  eileen
The View St mansion, which is on the market for $6.35 million, has been used as a guesthouse for “Big Red’s” family and friends since she moved to Leake St to live behind her daughter, Jody, three years ago.

Real estate agent William Porteous said Ms Bond was downsizing and looking for something more practical.

Her daughter lives in another part of Peppermint Grove and so she bought a house directly behind her daughter’s which is just more practical for their day-to-day lives,” he said.

Jody Fewster lives with her husband, Damian, and their two sons, aged six and 10.

Ms Fewster said they had always been a close family.

We even lived in View St with her for a short time when we first came back from Sydney; it’s a fantastic house, she said.

Ms Fewster said her house was attached to her mother’s through an adjoining room and gymnasium.

We love having mum here, we have a ready-made babysitter, she said. Ms Fewster said the View St home held precious family memories.

I really miss the tennis court there, she said. At Christmas we’d all be out there playing cricket under the lights.

The classic Italianate residence has four bedrooms and four bathrooms, and a marble ensuite to the master bedroom.

It also has a swimming pool and a two-storey foyer, and is on a 1500sqm block.

Source  :  www.news.com.au

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remote controlTransform your home with the latest technology available through smart wiring, reports amanda rankin.

AS the name suggests, smart wiring is an intelligent integration of technology that can transform a home into a fully automated environment where the homeowner can control everything, with the touch of a button.

For those who have trouble programing the DVD player this may sound scary but fortunately, this one-touch button is on a remote control.

A remote control is specifically for people who don’t have the foggiest about electronics and just want to know which button to push, and when.

Intelligent Home is a Western Australian company with a team of skilled professionals who can install these intelligent systems and supply the homeowner with one fabulous remote that controls the lighting, the intercom, the telephone, the DVD player, Pay TV, CD, CCTV and other necessary abbreviations.

“The remotes are the secret to having a good experience with smart wiring,” Intelligent Home’s director Brenton Morris said.

“We recommend the remotes highly because anybody can use them.

“That’s our job at Intelligent Home, to set up these complicated systems and ensure that the end result is something that is easy for everyone to use.”

Intelligent Home predominantly deals with trade, and the building companies send the clients in to find out all about smart wiring at the very early stages of the project, usually well before the building process has even started. “We explain smart wiring, which is the data, the television, the Foxtel, the telecommunications and so forth, then we go through security, home theatre, multi-room audio, CCTV, intercom and lighting control, and once we’ve explained all of that to the client, we sit down and do a design with them,” Brenton said.

Depending on the client’s budget and personal requirements, the end result can be a high-tech home wired for sound, TV, security, telecommunications and lighting, all controlled from a central location and ready to face the technology of tomorrow.                                                                         

It sounds fabulous and it is, but what happens when some-thing goes wrong ?

“I’ve been working in electronics since I was 17 years old and things do mess up,” Brenton said.                                     

“We have a service division ready to handle any problems and we send the guys out and they fix the problem.

“We also handpick our electronics and one of the big things we go for is reliability.

“A lot of the products we sell are custom-made and are designed to integrate properly into the house and be reliable.”

 

www.inmycommunity.com.au

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A SET of ancient Aboriginal remains found during a clearout of a house in northern England are soon to be returned to Australia.
Workers stumbled across the two femurs, three skulls and an assortment of other bones while sorting through the Cheshire home of university professor John Kempster, a former Aboriginal Rights Association president, after he moved to New Zealand in 2008.

He had instructed auction house Andrew, Hilditch and Son to clear out his home and sell anything they thought valuable.

“After the removalists finished the clear-out they found a small wooden crate and jokingly said to me they were the dog’s bones in there,” auctioneer Tom Andrew said.

“I said ‘Let’s open it and see what’s inside’ and we found three skulls and one or two other pieces.

“I also found in another briefcase two femurs wrapped in newspaper.”

Not realising that Britain had an agreement with Australia to return indigenous remains, the bones and a selection of weapons given to Prof Kempster while he lived in South Australia in the early 1960s were put up for auction in November 2008.

But after about 20 minutes of frantic bidding, the remains were dramatically pulled from sale after the Australian High Commission telephoned to stop the auction.

A scientist was sent to examine the bones, which were confirmed as being of Australian indigenous origin.

They will be handed over on Thursday to two Ngarrindjeri elders who flew from South Australia to London to collect 16 individual remains held by three museums and the auction house.

Mr Andrew said he was happy to know the remains would soon be on their way to the National Museum of Australia, which will try to determine which indigenous community they came from.

“I’ll certainly be on the look out for more,” he said. “I think there are more around than we think.”

The Liverpool museum has two more sets of remains it plans to return to Australia at a later date.

Further south, the Brighton & Hove City Council has agreed to return two skulls and two femurs for further study in Australia.

However, it is still debating whether to give back a skull modified to be used as a water vessel and which has been stored at the museum since 1925.

www.news.com.au

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