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Effective from 1 July, people moving to Australia on a temporary skilled work visa will be entitled to a higher minimum salary.      aus_money1

The minimum salary that must be paid by Australian employers taking on foreign workers holding a temporary skilled work visa (457 Subclass visa) has increased by 4.1 per cent. The increase brings the minimum salary in line with the rise average wages since the previous wages review of August last year. The 457 Subclass visa entitles Australia immigration workers for a period of between three months and four years.

In addition to the changes in minimum salaries, the English language ability standards for trades people moving to Australian were also adjusted on 1 July. Previously, trades people were required to demonstrate a ‘vocational’ level of English. Under the new regulations, they must be able to demonstrate a ‘competent’ level of English. This brings the trades, such as carpentry, bricklaying and cookery to the same level in terms of English requirements as the other occupations listed as ‘in demand’ by the Australian immigration authorities.

The Skilled Occupations List includes all the occupations that are suffering skills shortages in Australia. Trades included in this list include a wide variety of professions e.g. fitters, hairdressers, cabinetmakers, landscape gardeners, electricians and locksmiths.

Source  :  www.globalvisas.com

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Welcome to Hogan Mining. We have extensive experience helping people get into the Australia mining industry.                                 

We provide assistance for hundreds of customers throughout Australia, New Zealand as well as many other countries.

We advise you on what you need to know to secure a mining job. We have assisted many people who are interested in high paying positions such as dump truck driving roles, as well as many other types of mining jobs.

 This is your future career – and you need to do it right. We can also help you avoid making common mistakes which can delay or affect your employment chances.

Visit our get started page and receive information that tells you exactly how to go about getting a job in the Australia mining industry, where the average salary is over $90,000 a year. Our expert recommendations for jobs are based on your specific requirements:

  • the jobs you indicate an interest in (or that we identify would be suited to you)
  • the regions you want to work in
  • training and licenses you require (if any), and where to get these
  • and we take into account your other preferences.
  • Source  :  http://www.hogan-mining.com.au/

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Channel Nine has announced an Australian version of The Apprentice will be made, to be fronted by Wizard Finance creator Mark Bouris.   donald_trump_story

To be produced by FremantleMedia Australia, it’s a surprising move given the franchise is now several years old and hardly considered “hot property” anymore. It’s been some time since we’ve seen The Trump on free-to-air, and even Seven’s attempt at the UK Apprentice, with Alan Sugar, didn’t exactly light up our screens either.

So can a local version work? FremantleMedia at least has a good track record at Australian adaptations of international series, including MasterChef Australia, Australian Idol, The Biggest Loser and Project Runway Australia.

Nine also found that its local version of Ladette to Lady did quite nicely, thank you. But in this game there are no guarantees.  Neither Australian Survivor or Celebrity Survivor, which like this format are both Mark Burnett franchises, worked in Australia.

It will also be risky launching a show that has succeeded with its wealthy excess in a time of recession.  But most reality shows hinge on their casting. Mark Bouris is offering the winner of the local series an executive position in his financial-services firm company, Yellow Brick Road on a cool six-figure salary.

To be part of my team you will need to understand the concept that everyone has financial dreams, and that this is something that all Australians are entitled to, he says. “In many cases owning your own home and a comfortable retirement is ultimately what people want. For me empathy is really important and I’m not interested in an apprentice who only wants to look after the top end of the financial spectrum.  Being in my team means that you will want to help both.”

If you are aged 18 and over from August 1st and available for filming from July to September then you’ve met the first two criteria for auditions. You can apply for the show until Friday July 3rd at www.ninemsn.com.au/apprentice.

The show is due to screen later this year.

Source  :  http://www.tv.com/story/15621.html

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From 1 July 2009, there will be changes to how certain types of income affect eligibility for the CSHC. Depending on your circumstances, these changes may impact on your eligibility for a CSHC and you may be required to provide additional information about your income to Centrelink.

The adjusted taxable income test for CSHC will include:

  • assessment of total net investment losses. Total net investment losses are the sum of net losses from rental property income and net losses from financial investment income, and
  • subject to the passage of legislation, reportable superannuation contributions may be included in the adjusted taxable income test for CSHC. Reportable superannuation contributions are discretionary or voluntary contributions, for example salary sacrifice contribution and personal deductible contributions. 

Note: losses from rental properties are already included in assessable income for CSHC. From 1 July 2009, the adjustable taxable income test will also include losses from.

Source  :  http://www.centrelink.com.au/internet/internet.nsf/payments/conc_cards_cshc.htm

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What is superannuation?

Superannuation is a way of saving for your retirement. Both you and your employer can make contributions that accumulate over time andsuper this money is then invested in shares, government bonds, property, or other appropriate investments.                                 

On retirement, or after disability or death you then receive the money (less charges and taxes) as regular periodic payments (ie, a pension), a lump sum payment, or a combination of both.

Employers must contribute to an employee’s superannuation fund. This is called the Superannuation Guarantee, which came into operation on July 1, 1992.

The amount of the contribution is 9 per cent of an employee’s wages (excluding overtime, leave loading and fringe benefits).

Some employees are left out. The Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act says that employers do not have to pay the Superannuation Guarantee in certain circumstances.

Some of the exceptions are:
• employees earning less than $450 per month;
• employees under the age of 18 who work 30 hours per week or less;
• employees over 70 years of age;
• anyone paid to do domestic or private work for 30 hours per week or less.

Can the employer pay more?

An employer can make payments above the compulsory superannuation guarantee as:
• a reward for a worker’s performance;
• a type of co-payment, where the employer’s contribution increases in line with the employees voluntary contribution; or
• a ‘salary-sacrifice’ – this is where the employer makes a contribution that would otherwise be paid as salary.

Note, there are limits to the amount of salary sacrifice that can be made in a financial year.

If you want your employer to pay more, you should get advice from a financial advisor, but keep in mind that employers are limited in the amount that can be claimed as a deduction for superannuation contributions made for a particular employee.

Check with your superannuation fund or the Australian Tax Office to find out what these limits are – they change each year.  www.ato.gov.au

Should I contribute too?

If you have money left over after your weekly expenses, and you want to save for the future, you may want to consider making superannuation contributions as compared to other forms of investment.

Note, there are aged base limits that affect whether or not you can contribute to superannuation – for details, see the Australian Taxation Office web site.

Some of the advantages are:
• generally, you pay less tax on interest from superannuation savings than bank interest;
• with a ‘salary sacrifice’ the superannuation contribution is taken straight out of your wages, so you are not tempted to use it for purposes other than savings.

There are limits to the amount that you can “salary sacrifice”;
• the interest on superannuation savings is ‘compounded’, that is, interest earned by the superannuation fund is added to the total investment, so the interest earns more interest.

The Australian Prudential Regulation Authority estimates that a sum of money ‘compounded’ at 7 per cent a year will double in value in ten years; and
• you may be able to access the benefits of the low income super rebate and low income spouse rebate.
• you may be able to access financial incentives offered by the Government such as the co-contribution scheme. Under this scheme Government will contribute up to $1500 (depending on your income) when you contribute to your fund.

Check the Australian Taxation Office web site for details.

Ultimately, the pros and cons of contributing to superannuation is something you should get advice about.

What are the tax advantages?

The maximum tax rate for your employer’s contribution is 15 per cent.

The income you earn through the fund’s investments is also taxed at a maximum 15 per cent rate.

Salary sacrifice contributions will be taxed at 15 per cent.

Once you reach 60 you can withdraw your superannuation as a lump sum or income stream tax free.

There are also tax advantages if you contribute to your spouse/de facto’s super fund. The set off depends on their income. Check the Tax Office for details.

What laws apply?

The main laws that apply to superannuation are the:
• Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act and Regulations (regulates most private superannuation funds);
• Superannuation Guarantee (Administration) Act and Regulations (tells employers the minimum contribution they must pay);
• Income Tax Assessment Act,.

The jargon

Accumulation funds – money is invested and the final benefit depends on the total contributions, plus earnings of the fund.

Annuity – like a pension. You receive regular periodic payments for either fixed amount of time or until you die.

Benefit – the money paid to you out of the superannuation fund or held on your behalf within the fund.

Contribution – the money paid into the superannuation fund by either you or your employer.

Defined benefit funds – the final benefit is paid on the basis of a specific formula, so the employer carries the risk if the growth of the fund does not cover the benefit.

Lump sum – money received in a single payment.

Preserved – money that you cannot withdraw from your fund until retirement or certain other events, eg reaching a certain age and leaving employment either temporarily or permanently. This includes money paid by your employer, interest earned on that money or contributions paid by a self-employed person which have been claimed as a tax deduction and any undeducted contributions you make after 1 July, 1999.

Rollover – transferring money from one fund to another.

Unrestricted or non- preserved amount – money that can be paid to you at any time form your superannuation fund

Rights to information

You are entitled to certain information from your superannuation fund. This includes:
• a member statement which shows the amount of your benefit at the start and end of the relevant period, the amount that is preserved and contact details (generally provided annually);
• a fund report which shows the fund’s financial position (generally provided annually);
• notification of changes that affect you, e.g. a change to the superannuation fund’s rules; and
• a statement that shows your benefit, including death benefits when you leave.

Source  :  www.news.com.au

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The strategy :  To work out how the changes to the health insurance rebate affect me.

I suppose it means I’ll be paying more for my health insurance. That’s the gist of it though it will depend on whether Opposition leader Malcolm Turnbull delivers on his threat to block the legislation. As you may have picked up from the federal budget, the Government needs to find savings to fund higher pension payments.

One proposed measure is means testing the health insurance rebate, which currently allows you to claim a tax rebate of 30 per cent of the cost of your health insurance if you’re aged under 65, 35per cent if you’re 65 to 69 and 40 per cent if you’re 70 or older.

Most people ask their health fund to reduce their premiums to take account of the rebate rather than paying the full premium and claiming the rebate in their tax return. For someone under 65, a monthly insurance premium of $250 could be reduced to $175. That won’t change if you earn up to $75,000 if you’re single and $150,000 for families. But if your income is higher, your rebate will be reduced or cut out altogether.

How will that work? Let’s look at singles first. If you earn $75,001-$90,000, your rebate will be reduced to 20 per cent. If you earn $90,001-$120,000, the new rebate will be 10 per cent.

Once your income exceeds $120,000 you will be ineligible for the rebate.

For families, the combined income limits are $150,001-$180,000 for the 20per cent rebate, $180,001-$240,000 for the 10 per cent rebate and the rebate will disappear altogether once family income exceeds $240,000.

All income thresholds will be indexed to wages and will be adjusted for families with one child in the same way that thresholds are already adjusted for determining whether you have to pay the Medicare levy surcharge if you don’t have private health cover. The threshold is currently lifted by $1500 for each dependent child.

The Government says the definition of your income for the rebate will be the same as for the Medicare levy surcharge. Challenger’s head of technical services, Alex Denham, says this definition is changing from July 1 to include your taxable income, reportable fringe benefits, salary sacrificed to super or any personal deductible super contributions made and net investment losses. So higher-income earners won’t be able to use strategies such as salary sacrifice to get or increase their rebate.

Would I be better off dropping my health insurance and paying the Medicare levy surcharge? The proposed measures also include a rise in this surcharge precisely to stop this sort of behaviour.

The 1 per cent surcharge will rise to 1.25per cent once income exceeds $90,000 for singles or $180,000 for couples and to 1.5 per cent for incomes exceeding $120,000 or $240,000. That extra tax may cancel out any savings from dropping your health cover.

MLC’s head of technical services, Andrew Lawless, says a better option may be to make changes to your policy, such as increasing the excess you pay before claiming on the cover or reducing cover on ancillary benefits. However, to avoid the surcharge you must have hospital cover with an excess of $500 or less for singles or $1000 or less for families or couples per calendar year.

When will the changes come in? Not until July 1 next year, so you have time to check the final details if the measures are passed and weigh up your options.

It’s worth noting that the Medicare levy surcharge income limits will be indexed from their current levels of $70,000 for singles and $140,000 for couples to the new $75,000 and $150,000 levels at this time.

Source : www.watoday.com.au

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