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Posts Tagged ‘permanent residence’

The Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, Senator Chris Evans, today welcomed the final report of the Baird Review on the legislation governing international education.

It is most pleasing to note Mr Baird’s support for the Rudd Government’s changes to the skilled migration program announced on 8 February 2010.

The skilled migration program changes will encourage overseas students to focus on obtaining a quality education from a high quality provider by removing incentives for students to apply for a course simply in the hope of being granted permanent residence.

Under the changes, the wide-ranging migration occupations in demand list was revoked and will be replaced mid-year by a new and more targeted skilled occupations list to be developed by the independent body, Skills Australia.

The new skilled occupations list will be tightly focused on high value skills that will assist in addressing Australia’s future skills needs. It will deliver a mix of skills across the professions and trades in areas such as healthcare, engineering and mining.

International students currently studying in Australia who hold a vocational, higher education or postgraduate student visa will still be able to apply for permanent residence if their occupation is on the new skilled occupations list.

Students currently studying a course in an occupation that is not on the new skilled occupations list will have until the end of 2012 to apply for a temporary skilled graduate visa which will enable them to spend up to 18 months in Australia to acquire work experience and find an Australian employer willing to sponsor them.

It must be remembered that a student visa is just that: a visa to study. It does not give someone an automatic entitlement to permanent residence.

International students should be focused on obtaining a good qualification from a quality education provider in a field in which they want to work. The changes will in no way impact on international students coming to Australia to gain a legitimate qualification and then return home.

Similarly, Australia’s migration program is not and should not be determined by the courses studied by international students.

Australia will continue to welcome international students and provide an opportunity for those who have the necessary qualifications and skills to find an Australian employer willing to sponsor them for a permanent visa.

Source  :  www.immigov.au

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This output:

  • strengthens the economic and budgetary benefits from granting permanent residence visas to skilled and business migrants
  • addresses key and emerging skill shortages, particularly in regional Australia
  • expands business establishment and investment.

Performance

In 2008–09, the department issued 114 777 Skill Stream visas, compared to 108 542 in 2007–08.

Regional migration and state-specific initiatives now account for 29.2 per cent of the Skill Stream of the Migration Program. The Australian Government works with state and territory governments to encourage Australian employers and potential overseas applicants to use these programs.

During 2008–09, the department issued 33 474 state specific and regional migration visas, an increase of 27.9 per cent over the previous year. Since the introduction of these programs in 1996, a total of 169 328 visas have been issued.

Regional migration continues to be a priority under the Skill Stream. Through their sponsorship of skilled migrants, state and territory governments have a direct influence on the number and skill sets of migrants who settle in their jurisdictions. The number of visas granted to people sponsored by states and territories was 14 055 in 2008–09. 

Read more go to  :  http://www.immi.gov.au/about/reports/annual/2008-09/html/outcome1/output1-1-1.htm

 

 

Description

Under this output, the department manages the entry of skilled and business migrants. State-specific and regional migration programs help employers and state and territory governments fill skill shortages that cannot be filled locally. These programs are targeted to address existing and projected skill shortages and help in the development of local communities.

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If you are a visitor to Western Australia you may drive on your overseas/interstate licence until it expires. You must carry your licence at all times when driving and comply with any conditions (where reasonable) that are endorsed on the licence.

If you have a permanent residence visa and intend on living in WA you must obtain a WA drivers licence within 3 months of getting the visa. After this period your overseas authority to drive will not be recognised.    www.dpi.wa.gov.au

THIS IS NEW LEGISLATION YOU NOW ONLY HAVE 3 MONTHS OF GETTING YOUR VISA, BEFORE YOU HAD 3 MONTHS AFTER ARRIVAL INTO PERTH. MAKE SURE YOU ARE COVERED FOR INSURANCE PURPOSES.

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