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1920s charm of North Perth home retained                                                                                                                                                                                           north perth home

RENOVATIONS were completed less than a year ago on the 1920s home owned by Karina and Chris Hiller for five years.

“We fell in love with it and we didn’t plan to renovate,” Mrs Hiller said.

“We loved the location, but realised it was getting a bit tight for space when we had a baby.”
So the couple demolished the rear half to allow for an open-plan extension.

They installed a new kitchen, plus an al fresco area because they enjoy entertaining.

Mrs Hiller said they wanted to achieve “retreat-style living” as a change of pace for her husband, who owned a busy cafe in Burswood and wanted the chance to unwind in a tranquil villa-style house.

They combined elements from the old and the new to suit their lifestyle and they think the location is golden because it’s only a 20-minute walk to the city.

Mrs Hiller said she loved the house because of its originality and charm.

“It has ornate and dome ceilings that we never wanted to touch because you can’t find homes with beautiful old things like these any more,” she said.

Other features include a pool, open fireplace, airconditioning, bore-water reticulation and double carport.

NORTH PERTH
$999,000
189 Grosvenor Rd

Three-bedroom, two-bathroom, single- storey house with airconditioning, covered al fresco area, high ceilings, tropical gardens and open-plan living area.
Agent: John Parzycki 0418 923 226, L.J. Hooker Willetton 9457 9955  Source  :  http://www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,25867487-5013239,00.html 


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AN MP wants Queenslanders to be buried in cardboard coffins in natural bush cemeteries where the decomposing bodies can promote vegetation growth.

coffinThe “green in death” approach has been advocated by Labor’s Barbara Stone who told Parliament about a body’s “natural nutrients.”

 

She suggested that more local authorities follow the lead of the Gold Coast City Council which is planning the state’s first natural bushland cemetery.

 

“The site will be an old quarry to be filled with suitable soil so that bodies can decompose and provide valuable nutrients that encourage the rejuvenation of native flora,” she said. 

Body disposal should have as little impact on the environment as possible after taking into account the deceased’s personal, cultural or traditional practices, Ms Stone said. If someone wanted to be buried in a cardboard box “under a shady tree” this should be permitted.

Ms Stone, who represents Springwood, said responsible Queenslanders should go to their grave in eco-friendly coffins made from fibre waste.

“Testing has shown that they release half the emissions of a standard coffin,” she said.

Of the 24,500 coffins used in Queensland last year, less than 100 were made from this alternative material.

This represented a waste of timber and valuable metals and exposed the environment to toxic embalming chemicals.

New South Wales, South Australia and Tasmania have bushland cemeteries where only native stone can be used as burial markers.

But Ms Stone said that if there was no stone the “savvy techno can have a GPS device placed in their hands so their families can return to honour the bushland settings and their loved ones”.

Queensland bans burials on private land although there are some exceptions – former premier Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen is at rest in the grounds of his home Bethany, near Kingaroy.

Source  :  www.news.com.au

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