Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Immigration News’

Fees and charges are reviewed on 1 July each year.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                ist2_5024438-twenty-dollars-pounds-and-euros

 A number of Visa Application Charges (VACs) and other fees will increase on 1 July 2009 in accordance with recent decisions made by the Australian Government.

 A number of other VAC and fees will increase in accordance with changes in the Consumer Price Index, or in the case of the second instalment of the visa application charge for the Contributory Parent visa category, by the Contributory Parent Visa Composite Index.

Source  :  http://www.immi.gov.au/allforms/990i/increase-fees-charges.htm

Read Full Post »

G’dayUK 2009 is a series of events positioning Australia as an innovative and thriving economy. The aim is to encourage British companies and1201173161413australia-flag consumers alike to take another look at Australia as a great place to invest in, work, holiday, do business with and generally get to know.

By highlighting the unique range of skills, resources and opportunities offered by Australia, the heavy-weight burst of activity aims to reinforce business and consumer partnerships between the two nations by focusing on four main areas: trade & investment, food & wine, migration and tourism.

Whilst G’dayUK has a serious message, the week will also be a vibrant celebration of uniquely Australian products, people, places, businesses, skills and attitude and an invitation for the British to get involved. A stellar cast of well-known Australians, including politicians, business leaders, artists, winemakers and chefs will showcase Australia as a modern, energetic and desirable business and leisure destination.

G’dayUK 2009 is supported by the New South Wales, Queensland, South Australian, Victorian and Western Australian State Governments, Australian Trade Commission, Qantas and Tourism Australia in conjunction with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Wine Australia, Australian Business and kselfridgesey private sector sponsors.

G’Day UK 2009 is a chance for Australian celebrities, governments, businesses and agencies to show off the sunshine in Australia.

Two week’s worth of events will showcase Australia as a place of investment, tourism, business, and more importantly, as a prime destination for skilled migrants.

The G’Day UK Week will begin with a Manchester Migration Open Day on the 21 June, and will end with tasting premium Australian wines and Australian-themed food and wine menus cooked by Michelin-starred chefs on the 4 July in Selfridges, Oxford Street, London.

All information at http://www.gday-uk.co.uk/events

Read Full Post »

Bruce McFarlane, Director of Small Business Development Corporation, state of Western Australia, says: “The state of Western Australia is keen to encourage businesswestern-australia-kangaroo-beach migration from UK.

“W.A. is investing many billions of dollars in major infrastructure projects in coming years to boost business and the general economy and you could play a major part in our future success.

“We have a wide range of free services available to help start and grow your business including business licences, market reports and analysis, how to register for tax, business grants and much more.

“W.A. is a low tax state for business, with land and property prices relatively cheap compared to other states and a range of tax breaks are available from the government.

Read Full Post »

Foreign students could be forced to leave – Research your migration agent first

SCORES of foreign students, suspected of using bogus documents to support permanent residency applications, have been discovered by Federal Government migration fraud investigators.

More than 60 students, whose documents were initially accepted as genuine by the Government, will be forced to leave Australia if they are unable to prove their documents are authentic.

It is the latest indication that rorting in the lucrative $15.5 billion international education industry — the nation’s third-biggest export earner — is a serious problem, which could undermine the integrity of Australia’s education and immigration systems.

The students are suspected of using fake references from employers, which claim to show they have 900 hours’ work experience in a job related to their area of study.

Foreign students are required to provide evidence of 900 hours’ work experience to support their applications for permanent residency.

Sources in the international education industry have told The Age some students pay up to $20,000 to rogue college operators or middlemen, such as unscrupulous migration agents or education agents, to obtain fake paperwork.

Trades Recognition Australia (TRA) is the body nominated by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship to assess skills, including those of foreign students. Under the Australian migration system, a successful skills assessment by TRA can be used by foreign students to support their permanent residency applications.

In the last financial year, TRA received 34,180 applications for skills assessment, about 10,000 of which were from foreign students. TRA initially accepted the documents of the students in question as genuine. But after the Federal Government received information suggesting their paperwork could be bogus, it sent letters to the students threatening to revoke their successful skills assessments if they did not prove their documents were authentic within 28 days.

More than 60 such letters have been sent to foreign students since the start of the year, with 48 sent last month alone.

The Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, which investigates matters relating to international education refuses to say how many students have already had successful skills assessments revoked.

“Disclosing departmental actions as part of quality control and fraud measure could adversely impact on the administration of the program,” the department said in a statement to The Age.

The students are believed to be either close to the expiry of their student visas or on bridging visas. Either way, they will be expected to leave the country within 28 days if they are unable to prove their documents are genuine.

The identification of students suspected of using bogus documents follows the discovery of an alleged racket uncovered by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship in March.

Three migration agents were allegedly providing fake documentation to support permanent residency applications for foreign students based on their claimed skills in a number of occupations, including cooking, hairdressing, horticulture work and car mechanics.

Investigations are continuing into possible offences relating to forgery and migration fraud, which carry penalties of up to 10 years’ imprisonment.

Source  :  www.theage.com.au

Read Full Post »

Australia is still open for business

Despite the current financial troubles plaguing the world, the Australian government continues to welcome business migrants who want to move to Australia to estab1201173161413australia-flaglish and operate a new business or purchase and operate an existing business.Migration opportunities also exist for people who wish to invest in Government bonds. Australia’s states and territories are competing in a bid to sponsor business people from around the world in an effort to attract investment and suitable migrants to their cities and towns. At the same time the Australian government has been at pains to stress the importance it places on small business in Australia and has rewarded the sector with significant tax relief. On March 28 2009, the Australian government announced more than AUD720 million (SLR 23 billion) of cash-flow relief and further initiatives to support small business are expected in the May budget.

Although the business world has been pessimistic about the impact of the global financial crisis, Australia has been better positioned than most countries to weather the storm. A survey conducted by the Small Business Development Corporation of small business sentiment in Western Australia has found that “there is more optimism within the small business sector than media reports would have us believe”, SBDC Managing Director Mr Stephen Moir said when the survey was released. This may make it a good time for potential business migrants to consider a move to Australia.

Many business people from around the world have already taken advantage of the opportunities offered under Australia’s business migration programme. A total of 6565 business visas were granted in 2008, a 12.5% increase on the 2007 figure. This is about equal to the number of business visas that can be granted before July 2009 under the recently announced cap. New business visa applications are still being accepted and processed as normal and no limits have been announced for 2010. It is not clear what effect the global downturn will have on demand for these visas and whether the caps for 2009 will have an effect on processing times in the future. There would appear to be little reason for the Australian Government to place significant limits on the number of business visas in the future – business migrants create job opportunities in Australia rather than reduce them.

Historically the Australian business visa programme has attracted mostly small to medium business people who are seeking better opportunities for themselves and their families in Australia. In recent years the program has attracted many applicants from countries such as the PRC, Indonesia and South Africa where there has been some political or economic instability and concern for the future.

Australia’s business visa program is targeted at small business owners and senior managers who have a proven track-record of successful business in their country and who have accumulated wealth through their entrepreneurship, which can be invested in Australia. Successful business applicants need to show that their business has recorded sales of more than AUD$300,000 (LSR 27,000,000) in at least two of the past four fiscal years or that they are a senior manager in a significant business, and that they have at least AUD$250,000 (LSR 22,000,000) in personal and business assets which they are willing and able to transfer to Australia. Business migrants who are over 45 or who do not have a good command of English must be sponsored by a state or territory of Australia.

Despite the global downturn, there are good business opportunities in Australia in many sectors and Australia remains very much open for business. In order to encourage business migrants to establish themselves in their area, some Australian states and territories, including Western Australia, offer incentives and assistance packages to qualifying new migrants and small business owners. Many states and territories offer discounted education for children of business migrants.

A successful business visa applicant will first be granted a temporary visa for four years within which time they must relocate themselves and their families to Australia and establish their business in the sponsoring state. Provided the relevant requirements are satisfied during this time, the person can apply for a permanent visa allowing them and their family to remain in Australia indefinitely. After a time, business visa holder can apply for Australian Citizenship should they want Australian nationality.
If you are thinking about migrating to Australia, the time might be now!

Source  :  www.sundaytimes.lk

 
         
 

Read Full Post »

Go Matilda is sorry to learn of the recent collapse of UK based Australian migration advisors 4 Corners, and is ready to assist affected individuals.

We understand that individuals who had instructed 4 Corners in the UK are being invited to instruct another firm, with several client files now retained in New Zealand.

Go Matilda will be pleased to discuss application status and strategy with affected individuals, and will be sympathetic in proposing fees.

If instructed, we are also able to take delivery of client files at our offices in Australia, so that client matters can be progressed quickly.

If you are affected by the collapse of 4 Corners and would like to discuss your visa application, how Go Matilda might help, and our fees, please contact us.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »